Choir Music for Pentecost and Trinity  

 

Will you come and follow me (The Summons) 

Earlier in 2021, during the January lockdown, due to a sharp rise in Covid-19 infections, the choir prepared the hymn – Will you come and follow me – in the comfort and safety of their own homes. The hymn text is centred around Christian initiation and vocation and it is also referred to as “The Summons”.  The text asks 13 questions asked by Jesus in the first person; ending with “are you prepared to use the faith you’ve found to re-shape the world around through my sight and touch and sound in you and you in me?”.      

The music for the hymn is set to a traditional Scottish melody, Kelvingrove, with a folk lilt that takes us in a gentle dance, perhaps reflecting the dance pattern of our faith we encounter – weaving around the ebb and flow of life’s journey. 

 

Will you come and follow me   

Will you come and follow me
if I but call your name?
Will you go where you don’t know
and never be the same? 
Will you let my love be shown,  
will you let my name be known,  
will you let my life be grown  
in you and you in me?  

Will you leave yourself behind
if I but call your name?
Will you care for cruel and kind
and never be the same?  
Will you risk the hostile stare  
should your life attract or scare,  
will you let me answer prayer  
in you and you in me?  

Will you let the blinded see
if I but call your name?
Will you set the prisoners free
and never be the same?
Will you kiss the leper clean
and do such as this unseen,
and admit to what I mean
in you and you in me?  

Will you love the ‘you’ you hide
if I but call your name?
Will you quell the fear inside
and never be the same?  
Will you use the faith you’ve found  
to reshape the world around  
through my sight and touch and sound  
in you and you in me?  

Lord, your summons echoes true
when you but call my name.
Let me turn and follow you
and never be the same.
In your company I’ll go
where your love and footsteps show.
Thus I’ll move and live and grow
in you and you in me.  

Words John L. Bell (b. 1949)  
Graham Maule (1958 – 2019)  
Tune KELVINGROVE  
© 1987 WGRG, Iona Community,  
Govan, Glasgow G51 3UU, Scotland  

 

Pentecost (Whit Sunday) 

The choir prepared a hymn individually at home during a very damp month of May for our Pentecost Sunday service in church and online, the recorded voices are blended together to form the choir we would hear in church.   Spirit of the Living God fall afresh on me was chosen as our hymn for Pentecost, a gentle hymn and quiet sincere prayer. 
On Pentecost Sunday, after great care and consideration, a limited number of singers from our choir returned to the church building to lead our worship and to sing the Eucharist each Sunday morning.   Unfortunately, the congregation cannot sing inside the church building, however, we are able to sing a Hymn of the Day outside as part of our Sunday morning worship (observing social distancing rules). 
Here is some more information about the celebration of Pentecost Sunday – it is a big celebration in the church’s year – and is often referred to as the “church’s birthday”. 

https://www.churchofengland.org/our-faith/what-we-believe/lent-holy-week-and-easter/pentecost 

Spirit of the Living God        

Spirit of the Living God,  
Fall afresh on me.  
Spirit of the Living God,  
Fall afresh on me.  
Break me, melt me, mold me, fill me.  
Spirit of the Living God,  
Fall afresh on me. 

Spirit of the Living God,  
Fall afresh on us.  
Spirit of the Living God,  
Fall afresh on us.  
Break us, melt us, mold us, fill us.  
Spirit of the Living God,  
Fall afresh on us.  

Words & Music Daniel Iverson (1890 – 1977) 

  

Trinity Sunday 

The choir prepared an anthem for Trinity Sunday service held in church and online on Zoom.  Our Gospel reading for the day came from John 3.1-17 and an appropriate anthem was chosen, God so loved the world.
The words are taken from the Pharisee Nicodemus’ encounter with Jesus in the dead of night.
A Jewish leader, Nicodemus, recognised that Jesus was the Son of God and had been sent into the world by God, not to condemn the world, but to redeem the world and bring all humankind closer to God.  
The music is from a Passiontide oratorio, “The Crucifixion”, composed by Sir John Stainer and Revd William Sparrow Simpson in the late 19th century.  The music was composed in the romantic style of that period.
Here is some more information on Trinity Sunday, a special celebration in church to mark the start of our journey through the Trinity Season (Ordinary Time).    

https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/beliefs/trinity_1.shtml 

The lengthy season is marked inside our church with lots of green colour – a time to grow, explore, and reflect on our journey in faith – as God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit, weave themselves into our lives and lead us into true joy.

God so loved the world        

God so loved the world  
that he gave his only begotten Son,  
that whoso believeth in him should not perish,   
but have everlasting life.  
For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world,  
but that the world through him might be saved.  

Text compiled by Revd William Sparrow-Simpson (from John 3)  
Music: From Oratorio ‘The Crucifixion’ John Stainer